“Get to Know You” Activities

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Similarity circle

This activity is best done outside or in a gymnasium (any place where the students can be loud!). Have the group form a large circle. Read a statement aloud (suggestion list is below) and tell the students that if the statement pertains to them, they should run into the circle as excitedly as possible. When they run into the center of the circle, they can jump around, yell “woohoo”, give others in the circle a high five, etc.

This activity allows students learn about each other and see who shares some similarities. Be sure to yell out statements that are inclusive, so that students have the opportunity to run into the center a few times.

Statement suggestions…

Run into the circle if you…

…have a sibling!

…have a pet!

…are excited about starting a new school year!

…ate ice cream this summer!

…live in (specific town)

…are wearing socks!

…like to read

Birthday line

Ask the students to get into groups based on their birth month. The tricky part: they can’t talk to each other. They must group themselves silently! The students should form the groups by communicating in ways that do not use words. Once the class is grouped by birth month, give each group an opportunity to yell out their birth month as loudly as possible! Which birth month group can yell the loudest? Have the class gather together again, and now their goal is to get into a line in the order of their birthdays. They should do this activity without talking too! Since they know who shares a birth month, they can figure out the order of the months but now need to use nonverbal communication to put themselves in order. Once the students believe that they are in the correct order, have them take turns calling out their birthday. Was their order correct? Follow up this activity by asking them what was easy or difficult about using non-‐verbal communication.

Opinion blobs

Have the students stand up and gather together in the center of the classroom. Designate one side of the classroom as “yes” and the other side of the classroom as “no”. Ask the group a series of yes or no questions. The students will gather together on the side the matches their opinion.

You can also ask non yes/no questions and designate areas of the classroom for specific answers.

Yes/no question suggestions:

Do you like ice cream?

Did you swim in a lake this summer? Are you wearing red?

Do you have a sister?

Do you have a summer birthday? Do you play an instrument?

Non yes/no question suggestions:

Which sport do you like the best: soccer, baseball, or lacrosse? An area in the room is designated for each sport.

Which animal would you rather have for a pet: snake, lizard, hamster?

Which ice cream flavor do you like the most: chocolate; mint chocolate chip, or black raspberry?

Would you rather: play video games, climb a tree, or play a board game?

Would you rather eat: a worm, a dragonfly, or a beetle?

Steve Hiles

I am a retired military and elementary school teacher living in Tennessee. I am an avid reader and love to write. I am very passionate about helping teachers. I hope you find my educational tips and strategies useful,and enjoy hearing about my personal journey.

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Steve Hiles

I am a retired military and elementary school teacher living in Tennessee. I am an avid reader and love to write. I am very passionate about helping teachers. I hope you find my educational tips and strategies useful and enjoy hearing about my personal journey. Thanks for visiting!

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